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Jewels for Me
Fine Gemstone Jewelry in 14K Gold

Cuprite Meaning, Powers and History

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Cuprite is a beautiful mineral composed mostly of copper. This mineral was only first recognized and described in 1845. The name cuprite comes from the Latin word cuprum, which is the word for copper, because cuprite has such a high copper content. In fact, cuprite produces the greatest yield of copper per molecule out of any mineral in the world. Cuprite is also sometimes known as ruby copper because of its beautiful, deep ruby red color. Cuprite is still mined in many countries throughout the world today, and is now used more commonly for industrial reasons rather than for jewelry.
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Chalcotrichite is a fibrous variety of cuprite, and is a mineral that is extremely attractive and desirable to collectors. The reason for its appeal lies in the fact that Chalcotrichite consists of many attractive, fine needle or hair-like crystals of cuprite within. Another reason is that it has a very high amount of sparkle or fire. The nickname for chalcotrichite is hairy copper, which old miners came up with in reference to the bits of cuprite within the crystals. For the gem collector, the color of cuprite is very appealing. Cuprite ranges in color from carmine red, red-brown, sometimes gray-black, and finally, a very deep red; so deep in fact, that it might almost look black. In the best examples of the crystal, the true deep reds are visible in reflection inside the almost black crystal. The deep red color of cuprite is similar to that of a pyrope garnet.

Design Your Own Family Keepsake

Combine Lab Emerald with any gemstone to create your own unique family keepsake with the birthstones of your loved ones, or your favorite combination of colors.
Combine Lab Emerald with: 
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Select a gold color:
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Cuprite has also been known to be easily mistaken for the beautiful hematite. Cuprite has a highly refractive index, which in fact is actually greater than a diamond’s. It also is a very dense stone, transparent to translucent, and has semi-metallic luster. Because cuprite is soft, rating only a 3.5-4 on the hardness scale, it is really too soft for jewelry and it is also very difficult to cut. Well-developed cubic cuprite crystals are the most highly sought after. In the gem world, cuprite is a crystal that represents great self-respect and deliverance. It is a stone that can help the wearer to thrive in all aspects of our lives, and bring a great amount of inner peace.
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Cuprite is usually formed as a secondary mineral in the oxidized zone of copper deposits. It is commonly found accompanied by malachite, azurite and chalcocite. Small deposits of cuprite are sometimes found in association with malachite or azurite, on ancient coins that have been buried for thousands of years. The only source of very large cuprite stones yielding up to 300 carats, is Onganja, Namibia. The most well-known and major sources of cuprite can be found in South Australia, Northeast France, Southwest Germany, East-central Greece, Chile, Mexico and England. Only some crystals from Santa Rita, New Mexico are suitable for cutting into beautiful stones for display. Cuprite can also be found in Zaire, Japan, Bolivia, Hungary, and in the United States in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Michigan.
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